7 Habits of a Successful Scaled Agile Adoption

Agility is not an initiative, it is a movement and a journey that can transform any organization so that it has the ability to navigate complexity with clarity of purpose and speed to achieve the best outcomes. Like Lean thinking, Agile involves a cultural change that helps to eliminate unnecessary processes and artificial boundaries to help focus our energy on what matters most to our clients.

Last week I delivered several workshops at the 2016 Interconnect conference focused on adopting Agile DevOps practices. While preparing for this conference I had the opportunity re-read book “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”, by Stephan R. Covey and was struck by the similarities between the principles in his book and those of found in lean / agile development.

In this book the 7 habits, provided the reader with excellence guidance to better manage themselves and their environment. Required reading when I first began my career these 7 habits, listed below, have already helped millions of people improve their effectiveness and better the quality of their life.

  • Habit 1: Be Proactive
  • Habit 2: Begin with the end in mind
  • Habit 3: Put first things first
  • Habit 4: Think win/win
  • Habit 5: Seek first to understand, then to be understood
  • Habit 6: Synergize
  • Habit 7: Sharpen the saw

Likewise, the 7-Habits for a Successful Scaled Agile Adoption using IBM CLM will provide a set of practices to improve the effectiveness of your agile adoption by assisting you with creating a culture in which the values of sustainable predictable development, individual self-management and rapid product innovation are possible.

For example Habit 2 “Began with the end in Mind”

Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) focused developing a Vision and Roadmap for the product prior to conducting Release and Sprint Planning (actually they refer to it as PI planning)

7 Habit - Slide 2

These tactics give the agile teams with the opportunity to plot their course at a high-level to assure they’re going in the right direction.

The details of these 7 habits, listed above, have been provided in the following presentation

http://www.slideshare.net/rfeggins/slideshelf

 

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Getting started with Node.js and IBM Bluemix – Here is a good intro tutorial

Recently had the opportunity to run through a good Node.js tutorial on IBM Bluemix.

The sample application demonstrates how to build a simple sentiment analysis app using Node.js and a couple modules.  It takes a keyword, or hashtag, connects to Twitter to find matching tweets, and runs those tweets through a “sentiment analysis” module to produce a sentiment score.  ou will learn how to clone project, push changes to your Git repository and quickly deploy the app to Bluemix, see the complete tutorial on IBM Bluemix

You will learn how to clone project, push changes to your Git repository and quickly deploy the app to Bluemix, see the complete tutorial on IBM Bluemix Clone, edit, and deploy an app,

Here is a link to  the IBM Bluemix tutorial.  The instructions had me fork the project to create an on instance and IBM DevOps services automatically added to a git repo hosted on IBM Bluemix as well as connected to an initial deployment pipeline to help me get started.

Bluemix-Sentiment-Analysis-App.png

You can play with an instance of the application running at http://simplesentimentanalysis.mybluemix.net/

Get a SAFe Agile Training!

#devops, #ibm, #interconnect-2016, #safe-agile-training, #training-and-development

Picking an Agile Coach – Lessons from the Trenches

Working with new teams is always fun. Here are some Agile Coaching essentials

Reedy Feggins Jr

Picking an Agile Coach is often a trying task for most organizations. What is an Agile Coach and what qualities make a good one. These are just some of the common questions most organizations have.

As it takes time to really adopt new practices and behaviors, the Agile Coach must be more than just a recently trained ScrumMaster that usually “swoops in” to deliver words of wisdom and then makes a sharp exit. The coach must be able to spend time with the team to help them to become more aware of their workflow and how to collaborate effectively.

In a nutshell, an “Agile Coach” must help the project leaders, and the teams learn how to successfully apply the required agile practices.  The coach must be familiar with how each agile role (e.g.,  Team, Product Owners, and ScrumMaster) are impacted by an Agile Transformation as well as the…

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Succeeding with your First Agile Pilot Project

Reedy Feggins Jr

Successful agile transformations often times require successful agile pilot projects. Often time a successful initial pilot is the most critical step early in a successful enterprise agile adoption. If the pilot project is a success then the organization has a tangible example to get behind but if the project fails (or just fails to meet expectations) then the entire agile initiative could be derailed by critics. Because no one really likes change unless they are driving it.

Here is a presentation a I delivered a few years ago on running a successful agile pilot Succeeding with your First Agile Pilot Project

The presentions covers

  • Picking the Right Agile Pilot
  • Choosing the best set of Agile Practices to adopt
  • Providing the necessary education, tooling and governance
  • Learn and Adapt from the pilot

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What is DevOps?

Here is a good article on the five key practices for what IBM considers DevOps. They are:

Plan, Track, and Version Everything
Dashboard Everything (my personal favorite, I am a big believer in transparency)
Automate Everything
Test Everything
Monitor and Audit Everything

Check out article for more details

Dan Toczala's Blog

Recently I took over as the manager of the Emerging Technologies team at IBM/Rational.  One of the Emerging Technologies that my team is supposed to focus on is the area of DevOps.  So now I have a small team that is focused on DevOps.  But what in the world is DevOps?  I thought that I knew what it was, but I figured that I would do a quick experiment to improve my understanding.  I decided to ask several different people for their definition of DevOps.  Surprise!!  I got back about as many different answers as people that I  asked.  (OK, I wasn’t surprised, but that is why I did the experiment in the first place)

“Big deal”, you may be thinking, “all you have done is to state the obvious”.  But the more that I thought about it, the more that it bothered me.  The goal of my team is…

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Jazz Moves – Learning the basic steps

Nice article on Blue Mix

Dan Toczala's Blog

Recently I have been getting a lot of email requests from people asking if they can do something “non-standard” with Jazz.  I am going to answer your questions, but I am also gong to tell you WHY you get the answers that you do from our experts.  Here is a sanitized example of a recent email:

Hi Daniel
My name is John Doe. I saw that you wrote an article on the CLM deployment wiki 
on Jazz.net. I have a question that you may be able to help with.
A customer is deploying CLM 5.0 with Oracle and they have a standard practice of creating a single "temp" tablespace for a set of applications like our CLM suite. Will everything in the CLM suite function correctly if all four CLM apps use the same "temp" tablespace or is it necessary for each app to have its own temp tablespace as…

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