7 Habits of a Successful Scaled Agile Adoption

Agility is not an initiative, it is a movement and a journey that can transform any organization so that it has the ability to navigate complexity with clarity of purpose and speed to achieve the best outcomes. Like Lean thinking, Agile involves a cultural change that helps to eliminate unnecessary processes and artificial boundaries to help focus our energy on what matters most to our clients.

Last week I delivered several workshops at the 2016 Interconnect conference focused on adopting Agile DevOps practices. While preparing for this conference I had the opportunity re-read book “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”, by Stephan R. Covey and was struck by the similarities between the principles in his book and those of found in lean / agile development.

In this book the 7 habits, provided the reader with excellence guidance to better manage themselves and their environment. Required reading when I first began my career these 7 habits, listed below, have already helped millions of people improve their effectiveness and better the quality of their life.

  • Habit 1: Be Proactive
  • Habit 2: Begin with the end in mind
  • Habit 3: Put first things first
  • Habit 4: Think win/win
  • Habit 5: Seek first to understand, then to be understood
  • Habit 6: Synergize
  • Habit 7: Sharpen the saw

Likewise, the 7-Habits for a Successful Scaled Agile Adoption using IBM CLM will provide a set of practices to improve the effectiveness of your agile adoption by assisting you with creating a culture in which the values of sustainable predictable development, individual self-management and rapid product innovation are possible.

For example Habit 2 “Began with the end in Mind”

Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) focused developing a Vision and Roadmap for the product prior to conducting Release and Sprint Planning (actually they refer to it as PI planning)

7 Habit - Slide 2

These tactics give the agile teams with the opportunity to plot their course at a high-level to assure they’re going in the right direction.

The details of these 7 habits, listed above, have been provided in the following presentation

http://www.slideshare.net/rfeggins/slideshelf

 

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Getting started with Node.js and IBM Bluemix – Here is a good intro tutorial

Recently had the opportunity to run through a good Node.js tutorial on IBM Bluemix.

The sample application demonstrates how to build a simple sentiment analysis app using Node.js and a couple modules.  It takes a keyword, or hashtag, connects to Twitter to find matching tweets, and runs those tweets through a “sentiment analysis” module to produce a sentiment score.  ou will learn how to clone project, push changes to your Git repository and quickly deploy the app to Bluemix, see the complete tutorial on IBM Bluemix

You will learn how to clone project, push changes to your Git repository and quickly deploy the app to Bluemix, see the complete tutorial on IBM Bluemix Clone, edit, and deploy an app,

Here is a link to  the IBM Bluemix tutorial.  The instructions had me fork the project to create an on instance and IBM DevOps services automatically added to a git repo hosted on IBM Bluemix as well as connected to an initial deployment pipeline to help me get started.

Bluemix-Sentiment-Analysis-App.png

You can play with an instance of the application running at http://simplesentimentanalysis.mybluemix.net/

IoT Continuous Engineering: Pitfalls and Solutions for Agile and Systems Developers — Building Software, Author, Jim Ruehlin

Below is the presentation a college of mine, Jim Ruehlin , gave at All things Open 2016. The goal was to give people a wider perspective when formulating their Internet of Things development strategies. IoT is still relatively new. There are many similarities between Agile and Systems development styles, and some important differences. The people entering IoT development come with the histories and […]

via IoT Continuous Engineering: Pitfalls and Solutions for Agile and Systems Developers — Building Software

Internet of Things, are we ready?

IBM Watson Internet of Things, IoT in the cognitive era

Most analysts agree that that the Internet of Things (IoT) will be huge and it’s not hard to explain why it’s happening now. As virtually everything becomes connected—from cars to crops to conveyor belts—businesses can harness the resulting data to improve almost every aspect of what they do.

Gartner predicts that the total number of connected consumer, to grow to 30 billion units by 2020, representing an almost 30-fold increase over the 900 million things in 2009.  (1)

With the cost of sensors, networking chips and other technology required to connect to the Internet devices ranging from light bulbs to smartwatches to industrial equipment becoming inexpensive.  IoT will radically change the way businesses operate and people interact with the physical world.

iot-device-roadmap

We are on the threshold of a massive explosion of connected things; with 10+ billion devices currently connected to the Internet around the world. This number is expected to dramatically increase over the next decade, with estimates ranging from 50 billion to 1 trillion devices, the Internet of Things has the potential  to create economic impact  of $2.7 trillion to $6.2 trillion annually by 2025

How to get started?

As with other broad technology categories such as the cloud or mobile, the IoT offers quality-of-life improvements using devices that comprise the broad IoT perform different functions.

As more and more devices connect together to form the Internet of Things, the volume of data is expanding at an exponential rate. However currently most software applications can’t act on nearly 90 percent of the data generated from these connected devices. Due in large part to our limited ability to analyze the vast quantities of unstructured information we receive from IoT devices.

IoT value is realized in four foundational areas

  • Industry Transformation – Evolving new business models
  • Application and Solutions – Optimizing operations and enhancing performance
  • Platforms – Building and managing IoT solutions
  • Devices and Networks – Connecting what matters

Using IoT Watson computing capabilities, gives us the opportunity to make sense of IoT data such as images, video, and text in a variety of languages. As the cognitive system “learns,” it can even provide recommendations about your best course of action.

composable-business

IBM is investing $3B over the next four years to help clients and ecosystem partners build IoT solutions.

 IoT 1 - Cloud Open Platform.png IBM IoT Cloud Open Platform for Industries
New analytics services that clients, partners and IBM will use to design and deliver vertical industry IoT solutions.
 iot-2-iot-services-within-bluemix New IoT services within IBM Bluemix
Enabling developers to easily integrate IoT data into cloud-based development and deployment of IoT apps.
 iot-1-ibm-partner-ecosystem Expansion of its ecosystem of IoT partners
From silicon and device manufacturers to industry-oriented solution providers

To learn More

IBM and Coursera have teamed up to offer a new online course, “A Developer’s Guide to the Internet of Things”, for developers who are just getting started with IoT. This entry-level course focuses on Raspberry Pi, the IBM Bluemix platform and Node-RED for rapid application development on both the device and the cloud.

To enroll select to, https://www.ibm.com/internet-of-things/learn/library/build-skills/

Reference

  1. How to Develop Applications for the Internet of Things | CIO, http://www.cio.com/article/2843814/developer/how-to-develop-applications-for-the (accessed November 04, 2016).
  2. Kim Escherich, @kescherich, “Internet of Things From hype to reality”, retrieved November 4, 2016, http://www.slideshare.net/ibmsverige/ibm-bc2015-internet-of-things-from-hype-to-reality
  3. IBM What is IoT, retrieved November 4, 2016, https://www.ibm.com/internet-of-things/learn/library/what-is-iot/

Great article on Essential SAFe

 

Here also is a a link the SAFe(r) Foundations slideshare presentation. The intended for the sole purpose of promoting adoption and use of the Scaled Agile Framework(R) to benefit of the enterprises and individuals who apply it

Get a SAFe Agile Training!

#devops, #ibm, #interconnect-2016, #safe-agile-training, #training-and-development

Why Get Disciplined Agile Certified

Getting Disciplined Agile Certified

As a Agile coach, I believe it is my responsibility to provide the best guidance to the organizations and teams that I work with to him them gain mastery of agile practices.  In most of my engagements, the first step is to provide initial training to the team  to help them gain the knowledge they need to apply techniques such as Scrum, XP, DAD, SAFe SPC, Lean and Continuous Delivery (sometimes referred to as DevOps).

Why get certified?

While certifications are no guarantee that a coach such as myself as the appropriate knowledge or experience to help, obtaining certifications along with the ability to demonstrate projects and programs where the agile techniques learned have helped is often a great way to ensure this.  As such, since 2008 I have embarked on a continuous learning journey to improve my skills and experience through certifications. Presently, I hold certifications as CSM, PMP, SAFe and am in the process of obtaining my DAD certifications.

People who are learning and attempting to mastering new skills often pass through three quite different stages of behavior: followingdetaching, and fluent.  The Disciplined Agile Consortium recently has established a certified approach based on a principled, Shu-Ha-Ri strategy.

Shu-Ha-Ri

Shu-Ha-Ri is a way of thinking about how you learn a technique. The name comes from Japanese martial arts (particularly Aikido), and Alistair Cockburn introduced it as a way of thinking about learning techniques and methodologies for software development.

The word “Shuhari” roughly translates to “first learn, then detach, and finally transcend.”  

In this approach, the consortium has established four certification levels:

  1. Disciplined Agilist-White Belt(Shu)
  2. Disciplined Agilist-Yellow Belt(Shu)
  3. Disciplined Agilist-Green Belt(Ha)
  4. Disciplined Agilist-Black Belt (Ri)

References

About the Author

Reedy has over 20 years of experience in Solution Architecture, and  IT/software development where he has worked in a variety of roles such as Business Analyst, Tester, Development Project Manager, Consultant and Agile Coach.   He provides thought leadership and coaching that focus on helping medium and large companies achieve organizational agility using a combination of Lean, Agile, DevOps and Business Continuous Delivery practices.

Opinions represent those of the author and not of any other organization.  The content  shared on this site does not imply endorsement of specific agile or lean methods or practices beyond those described on the official IBM websites.